What does an OARRS report show?

WELCOME TO OARRS The Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS) is a tool to track the dispensing and personal furnishing of controlled prescription drugs to patients.

When do you use OARRS?

OARRS is designed to monitor this information for suspected abuse or diversion (i.e., the transfer of legally prescribed drugs for illegal use) and can give a prescriber or pharmacist critical information regarding a patient’s controlled substance prescription history.

Does gabapentin show up on OARRS?

Established in 2006, OARRS collects information on all outpatient prescriptions for controlled substances and one non-controlled substance (gabapentin) dispensed by Ohio-licensed pharmacies and personally furnished by Ohio prescribers.

Is OARRS only for Ohio?

No. Only pharmacists who dispense controlled substances to patients residing in Ohio are required to register for an OARRS account.

Does Ohio have a prescription drug monitoring program?

Information and data are provided for the Ohio Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP), which is named the Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS). The OARRS is administered by the state’s Pharmacy Board.

Do written prescriptions expire Ohio?

Prescription orders must be maintained in pharmacy for 3 years.

What medications show up on OARRS?

Ohio’s prescription drug monitoring program, known as the Ohio Automated Rx Reporting System (OARRS), collects information on the distribution of prescription controlled substances and two non-controlled drugs, gabapentin and naltrexone, to Ohio patients.

What drugs are reported to OARRS?

OARRS collects information on all outpatient prescriptions for controlled substances and gabapentin dispensed by Ohio-licensed pharmacies and personally furnished by licensed prescribers in Ohio. OARRS also tracks naltrexone dispensed by pharmacies to Ohio patients and medical marijuana sold by Ohio dispensaries.

Do written prescriptions expire?

When your healthcare provider sends in a prescription to your pharmacy, you usually have up to one year to fill the prescription before it expires in most states. The exception to this is prescriptions for controlled substances, which may not be valid after 6 months or less, depending on state laws.